Newsflash July 2011

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 ePIC Events Newsflash June 2011

ePIC 2011
London 11-13 July 2011

Late submissions

Editorial

Could the solution to trust and privacy be to make personal data public?

ePIC 2011 update: keynote speakers, Pebblegogy and the Bellinis

Chapter proposals on Virtual Worlds in Online and Distance Education

Partner Events

  • AAEEBL Boston (USA) 25-28 July 2011

  • World of Learning Exhibition, Birmingham (UK) 27-28 September 2010

  • ePortfolios Australia Conference 2011 (EAC2011) 17-18 October, Perth

  • International Literacy Management workshop, Freiburg (Germany)  18-19 November  2011

 

Could the solution to trust and privacy be to make personal data public?

 

Editorial

In the developments relative to trust and privacy technologies, one of the goals was to provide people with the means to protect their personal data: personal data is mine! This has naturally led to the idea of personal lockers and personal data stores: if all of my data is in my personal locker, then I can decide who has access to it and under which conditions (for how long, to do what, etc.). Personal Data Stores rapidly became the Holy Grail for the most advanced actors in the field of personal data management, from ePortfolios to personal health records. Personal lockers and personal data stores helped us to understand that an Internet based on a clear separation between storage of personal data and services creating/exploiting them would revolutionise the Internet. Empowered users would be at the centre of an ecosystem they control. "The Semantic Web & THE POWER OF PULL", by David Siegel, admirably describes the transformations one should expect from the systematic use of personal lockers.

However radical and transformative, personal lockers and personal data stores have their limits. One is to be found in the initial statement: personal data is mine! Data, the product of social interaction and processes, is generally shared with other people and organisations: I share the name of my parents, the review of a paper submitted with reviewers and conference organisers, the diagnosis of my illness with a doctor, a laboratory and a drugstore. Even my intimate thoughts can be shared when I commit a freudian slip... If most data is shared with others then we might want to rewrite the initial statement with: personal data is ours! Translation into technology of this statement might lead to something radically different from personal data stores as personal information silos.

Wouldn't it be wonderful if we were able to exploit the natural property of personal data as a connection to people (places, ideas etc.) while preserving the need for privacy, anonymity and enabling trust? Could Shared Data Stores or Shared Lockers be a solution?

Imagine that, instead of storing our data in personal lockers, we store it in Public Anonymous Data Stores (PADS). When I store a piece of data in a PADS, I receive in exchange a key that allows me to edit the data and open my mailbox, so if someone wants to contact me, or if my profile matches a search engine query, a message is left in the box connected to this anonymous piece of data.

My data can be distributed over an unlimited number of PADS and I'm the only one to know that it is my data. I am the only one able to connect my real me(s) to any piece of data stored by me. For the rest of the world, my data is just a drop in an ocean of anonymous data.  No need for fancies technologies to protect it —why break in safes if money grows on trees in public parks?

To create a trustworthy Internet respectful of privacy, shouldn't we simply make our personal (meta) data public?

What initially sounds like a paradox might become a founding principle of a trustworthy Internet that could announce the demise of the business models on which Linkedin, Facebook and Google are built... Of course, PADS would be one component of a trust architecture. Another component would have to provide every one with some kind of tangible representations of our identities. The required technology already exists, it's called a proxy, and  would require little tweaking to make it a powerful personal agent to operate on our behalf in a trust environment. That will be our next story...

If you are interested to explore further this idea, you are welcome to contribute to the discussion and join us at the 9th international ePortfolio and Identity Conference.

NB: a more developed version of this text is accessible at http://t.co/gotaqdn

Join us at ePIC 2011 London, 11-13 July 2011

The ePIC 2011 Team

London, 11-13 July 2010

Conference Programme Update

 

 

 

Organisers

IOS logoEuroportfolio100

 

 

Partners

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International Journal of ePortfolioeLearningEuropathe Kantara Initiative

We have the pleasure to announce that Shane Sutherland, Geoff Rebbeck and Helen Barrett will deliver keynote addresses to the delegates of the 9th international ePortfolio and Identity Conference..

Picture of Mark StilesShane Sutherland is the Development Director at Pebble Learning. He is an active contributor to the eportfolio community being a member of the Becta ePortfolio Experts Group; the International Coalition for ePortfolio Research and the JISC-CETIS ePortfolio Special Interest Group. Shane has contributed to, or managed, a number of research projects including ePISTLE, LIPID, eAPEL, MeLAS and Flourish.

Shane previously worked as a Principal Lecturer at the University of
Wolverhampton with roles in staff development and teacher education. This earlier work brought him into intimate contact with Interactive White Boards (IWB), Virtual Learning Environments (VLE) and Personal Digital Assistants (PDA), for which eP (ePortfolio) are the perfect two-letter antidote!

Geoff Rebbeck has been in Further Education for 12 years starting out as a lecturer in Health and Social Care. He has been a course leader for numerous health and social care courses, as well as assessing and verifying on NVQs across the care spectrum. He also teaches on the Cert. Ed. and its successor courses and has worked as a sessional tutor for the University of Greenwich on an innovative e-learning short course. His job as e-learning co-ordinator was brought into the College quality portfolio and now forms a major strand of improvement and innovation within the College. He recently introduced the idea of electronic personal learning spaces for staff into college to support radical changes in how all aspects of staff development is approached, captured, recorded and completed.

The College was a National finalist in AOC/NILTA Beacon College awards in 2006 in the ‘creating an e-enabling organisation’ category and a finalist in 2008 in the Staff development category. He was the National Star Award winner in 2010 in the Innovation category; based in part on the use of personal learning spaces in his College.

Picture of Mark StilesIn 2005, Dr. Helen Barrett retired from the faculty of the College of Education at the University of Alaska Anchorage and is now living in the Seattle area. She has been researching strategies and technologies for electronic portfolios since 1991, publishing a website (http://electronicportfolios.org), chapters in several books on Electronic Portfolios, and numerous articles. She was on loan to the International Society for Technology in Education between 2001 and early 2005, providing training and technical assistance on electronic portfolios for teacher education programs throughout the U.S. under a federal PT3 grant. In 2005, Dr. Barrett became the Research Project Director for The REFLECT Initiative, a two-year research project, underwritten by TaskStream, to assess the impact of electronic portfolios on student learning, motivation and engagement in secondary schools.

Dr. Barrett is currently doing research for a book on Interactive ePortfolios to be published by the International Society for Technology in Education. She is an adjunct faculty member for Seattle Pacific University, where she teaches about Issues and Advances in Educational Technology. Her international consulting focuses on the integration of ePortfolios for Learning and Digital Storytelling in K-12 schools and higher education. She is also an Apple Distinguished Educator and a George Lucas Educational Foundation Faculty Associate.

Open call for late submissions

If you missed the deadlines of the call for contributions, it is still possible to submit a contribution. Most presentations accepted at this stage will be given during the first day of the conference (Monday 11 July). Authors will be notified within 1 week if their submission is conform to the requirements of the call and will have to register immediately after acceptance.

For a complete view of the call: http://www.epforum.eu/epic2011/conference/call

Pebblegogy

During the conference you will have the opportunity to discuss with the authors of Pebblegogy, a book of two halves. The first provides the most detailed explanation of what PebblePad is, what it stands for and why it works the way it does. The latter half presents a rich collection of learning designs resulting from the contributions and collaborations of more than 40 practitioners from the UK and Australia.

Chapters include:

  • The principles of PebblePad
  • Planning purposeful activities.
  • Doing it differently: Bungee Jumping with PebblePad (Julie Hughes).
  • 38 guides for embedding activities in a range of contexts including work-based learning; collaborative learning; action planning and project management; experiential learning and planning personal and professional development.

This book is aimed at practitioners in higher education, further education and professional bodies.

Pebblegogy – ideas and activities to inspire and engage learners
Autors: Shane Sutherland, Jane Brotchie, Sarah Chesney
ISBN: 978-0-9565641-1-5
Cover price: £25.00

Social dinner

The Bellinis

Would you like a taste of London lifestyle? Join us for the Social Dinner and Party in a lively new style London brasserie on Tuesday 12 July, with live Jazz quintet the Bellinis.

Formed late one night in a dingy basement bar in Soho, 3 guys were on stage playing some swinging jazz when the doors burst open and 2 brunettes bounced in all lipstick and laughter. The bar tender had their usual order ready at the bar: “2 Bellinis for the girls” was the cry. After a little coaxing the girls took to the stage and with the hottest band in town that night, the crowd went wild. That night The Bellinis were born.
 

 

Chapter proposals on Virtual Worlds in Online and Distance Education

Chapter proposals are invited for an edited book on Virtual Worlds in Online and Distance Education, to be published by Athabasca University Press as part of Terry Anderson's Issues in Distance Education series. The book's scope will encompass the use of virtual worlds for fully online/distance and blended modes of education in post-secondary settings across the globe. There will be two types of chapters, namely chapters addressing specific themes and issues (5,000-8,000 words) and chapters reporting on case studies (2,000-4,000 words).

The Call for Proposals is available online at the following web site:
http://www.virtualclassrooms.info/vwwg/vwwgbook.html

The key dates are as follows:

  • July 22, 2011 - one to two-page proposals due
  • August 19, 2011 - authors notified as to the status of their proposals
  • November 18, 2011 - full chapter manuscripts due
  • January 27, 2012 - results of manuscript review process made available to authors
  • February 24, 2012 - revised chapter manuscripts due
  • late 2012 - publication of book in both print and online (open access) formats

Queries and expressions of interest can be directed to the editors, Sue Gregory, Mark J. W. Lee, Barney Dalgarno and Belinda Tynan at virtualworldsinODE@gmail.com. Please also feel free to share this information with others who you think might be interested..

 

Partner events



   

AAEEBL, Boston 25–28 July 2011

Context: The AAEEBL annual conference this year, July 25-28, 2011, in Boston will herald a global transition from the typically tentative, experimental deployment of portfolios to a new committed portfolio deployment characterized by significant curricular re-design within institutions of learning from primary school to graduate school.  This conference will also mark a fuller deployment of portfolios in support of those already in the workforce.  This fuller acceptance of portfolios reflects deep changes in both how knowledge is constructed in our society and in how graduates must direct their careers actively as they move from job to job.  Portfolios are quickly becoming essential gear to succeed in the world of today.

Conference link

ePortfolios Australia Conference 2011 (EAC2011) 17-18 October, Perth

Following on from the success of ePortfolios Australia Conference 2010 (EAC2010), the ePortfolios Australia Conference 2011 (EAC2011) will bring together national and international educators and thought leaders to showcase the ways e-portfolio practice is making a difference to adult education in Australia.

This major national tertiary education event will demonstrate the use of e-portfolios to support and engage adult learning from the:

 

World of Learning, Birmingham (UK) 28-29 September 2011

Featuring high profile case studies, interactive seminars and discussion forums, the World of Learning Conference programme concentrates on the current issues of most concern to L&D professionals. You will come away from the World of Learning Conference with genuine and inspiring solutions for your day-to-day and long-term business objectives.

To exhibit or to pre-register

visit www.learnevents.com or call +44 (0)20 8394 5171
 

International Literacy Management workshop, 18-19 November  2011,  Freiburg (Germany)

Chapter proposals are invited for an edited book on Virtual Worlds in Online and Distance Education, to be published by Athabasca University Press as part of Terry Anderson's Issues in Distance Education series. The book's scope will encompass the use of virtual worlds for fully online/distance and blended modes of education in post-secondary settings across the globe. There will be two types of chapters, namely chapters addressing specific themes and issues (5,000-8,000 words) and chapters reporting on case studies (2,000-4,000 words).

The Call for Proposals is available online at the following web site:

http://www.virtualclassrooms.info/vwwg/vwwgbook.html

Queries and expressions of interest can be directed to the editors, Sue Gregory, Mark J. W. Lee, Barney Dalgarno and Belinda Tynan at virtualworldsinODE@gmail.com. Please also feel free to share this information with others who you think might be interested.

2010 Proceedings

Conference proceedings

To access previous conference proceedings:
 
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